BioArctic will be issued European patent for Parkinson’s treatment strategy

BioArctic AB announced today that the European Patent Office (EPO) has issued a decision to grant the company’s patent application in Europe, EP09738534.8, for its Parkinson’s disease concept patent. The decision states that the European patent, EP 2 282 758 B1, will enter into force on November 21, 2018.

The granted concept patent in Europe protects the company’s innovative treatment strategy for Parkinson’s disease. Corresponding patents have previously been granted in the US and Japan.

BioArctic’s patent strategy is to protect our treatment strategy conceptually, with broad claims that prevent competitors from using the same treatment strategy, complemented by specific substance patents to provide protection against generics and biosimilars. The company has an active patent strategy covering all major geographic markets, including the US, JapanChina and Europe.

Gunilla Osswald, CEO of BioArctic said: “The granted concept patent in Europe, which protects the company’s innovative treatment strategy for Parkinson’s disease, is an in important part of the company’s patent strategy.

“Today there is no disease-modifying treatment on the market and we want to contribute with innovative and effective treatments that improve the Parkinson patients’ quality of life.”

 BioArctic CEO, Gunilla Osswald, said “we want to contribute with innovative and effective treatments that improve the Parkinson patients’ quality of life.”

BAN0805 is a drug candidate (an antibody against alpha-synuclein) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

The aim is to develop a disease-modifying treatment that stops or slows down disease progression. Collaboration with AbbVie was started in 2016 regarding the continued development of the company’s Parkinson program, focusing on BAN0805 with follow-up projects and diagnostics.

BioArctic is preparing for the application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the initiation of a clinical study of BAN0805 in the U.S., an IND. The project is based on research from Uppsala University in Sweden.

SOURCE

You Might Also Like